Dead or Alive 6 Preview – Flashy Combos & Ti(gh)t Clothing

Dead or Alive 6 Preview – Flashy Combos & Ti(gh)t Clothing

In my time as a part of WellPlayed I’ve found myself broadening my horizons when it comes to the fighting game genre. In my earlier years, I would pretty much exclusively play Tekken, as that was the fighter I grew up with. It wasn’t until I played Tekken 6 that I tried something else, with my next game being SoulCalibur IV (the choice made purely based on the fact that SC had Yoshimitsu who is my fave character to play as). Now I find myself spreading my mediocrity across various other titles like Dragon Ball FighterZ, Street Fighter V and now Dead or Alive 6. Unfortunately, on the balance of things Dead or Alive 6 is not the strongest amongst that bunch. It’s certainly not bad, and it may simply be due to personal preference, but here’s what I gleaned from my recent preview.

In my time as a part of WellPlayed I’ve found myself broadening my horizons when it comes to the fighting game genre. In my earlier years, I would pretty much exclusively play Tekken, as that was the fighter I grew up with. It wasn’t until I played Tekken 6 that I tried something else, with my next game being SoulCalibur IV (the choice made purely based on the fact that SC had Yoshimitsu who is my fave character to play as). Now I find myself spreading my mediocrity across various other titles like Dragon Ball FighterZ, Street Fighter V and now Dead or Alive 6. Unfortunately, on the balance of things Dead or Alive 6 is not the strongest amongst that bunch. It’s certainly not bad, and it may simply be due to personal preference, but here’s what I gleaned from my recent preview.

So if there wasn’t much to go on with the story, what else was there? Well, there were a couple other modes for me to try out. I’ll do the more interesting one first – the quest mode. The easiest way to describe this mode would be as a challenge mode of sorts. Each mission you are given has three objectives to complete. One is usually to just win the given fight, the others are usually a little more involved. Sometimes you have to do certain combos, juggle enemies or even knock them into environmental hazards. That last one is something I ended up completing accidentally as I pinned the AI against a wall and it queued. The environmental hazards are some of the more flashy things that DOA6 had to offer, and a personal favourite of mine would have been when a hazard would cause a dinosaur or dragon-like creature to pick up the opponent and throw them to the ground (RIP). There were some other smaller hazards like when fighting in the middle of a crowd, patrons would push the opponent back into the fighting area which would make for an interesting dynamic in terms of combos and potential juggling. I only got to do three of these quests but it seemed pretty cool, I can imagine the challenges getting increasingly more difficult the further you get along, though that could also be my ineptitude at fighters.

A gut-wrenching punch

A gut-wrenching punch

The arcade mode was where I got to really feel the different characters and how the overall gameplay was designed. I didn’t get to try every character, but the ones who I enjoyed the most were Hitomi and Ryu Hayabusa (they were the only movesets I could wrap my head around). However, where the game really shone in terms of gameplay was with its accessibility. DOA6 sees the introduction of the Fatal Rush system. Fatal Rush is basically a system that allows newer players to easily execute combos with one button. Naturally, I abused the hell out of this when I started out because I am absolute garbage at DOA, but after getting used to some of the characters’ combos I relied on this less and less (though it is nice for getting out of a quick bind). One of my favourite things to do with this was to mix it with the counterattack system as it allowed for some really devastating and demoralising counters. Outside of this, the actual combos were generally easy to pull off due to simple design in controls and some helpful keybinds like using the triggers for multiple button presses.

DOA6 utilises an entirely new engine which focuses on a variety of things. For starters, the body movement physics will be less exaggerated, basically meaning there will not be the insane amounts of boob jiggle that previous DOA games have had, but it’s still there. The amount of body movement is also now dependent on what the character is wearing, so someone wearing skin-tight clothing may not have the same amount of body movement as someone with looser clothing. It’s a nice level of detail that makes it a little less ridiculous but not so much as to rip out the heart of the game. The game also ran incredibly well, with me not seeing a single framedrop during my two hours or so with the game, which is great to see in a fast-paced fighter like DOA. This all comes with a version gorgeous and snappy set of visuals.

Dead or Alive 6 seems to be a solid entry into the DOA series. While it probably won’t be a contender for my preferred fighter amongst some rich competition, I can see how and why someone like our very own Zach Jackson would and should be excited for it.

Jordan lives and breathes Dark Souls, even though his favourite game is Bloodborne. He takes pride in bashing his face on walls and praising the sun. Hailing from the land of tacos, he is the token minority for WellPlayed.