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Hardware Review

PS5 DualSense Edge Controller Review

Is the price tag justified?

At the height of my obsession with Apex Legends, PlayStation released the back button attachment for the DualShock 4. Unfortunately, during the transition from PS4 to 5, my DualShocks were traded for DualSense, leaving my beloved back buttons out in the cold. I won’t sit here and say that using it massively improved my standing in ranked or even had me winning matches on the regular, but the freedom it allowed me to keep my thumbs on the sticks was worth the price of admission. What these back buttons ultimately did for me as a blue boy was lament that PlayStation didn’t have an answer to Xbox’s Elite Controller. Now, almost three years removed from me getting my first taste of an enhanced controller experience, Sony has finally entered the chat with the DualSense Edge.

Straight out of the box, the DualSense Edge looks and feels like a piece of premium equipment. Nestled neatly in a striking black and white carry case are the controller and all of its interchangeable gear. Along with the unit itself, the case carries four analogue sticks, two low-profile domes (like those on the PS3) and two high-profile domes, a set of back paddles, a set of half dome triggers, a 2.8-metre braided USB-C cable and a connector housing that locks the charging cable firmly to the controller. All these bits and pieces fit comfortably in the case, with room for an additional thumbstick module if you have one.

The form of the Edge will look very familiar to anyone used to the regular DualSense, as the overall shape is nearly identical. Minor differences can be seen at a glance, such as the more angular touchpad that now features the face button pattern, a shiny black finish to the middle section of the face and the function buttons that I’ll talk more about shortly. Still, the true changes will be felt more than seen.

The tiny little details make the Edge feel like a full package

Getting my hands on the Edge, I noticed the slight increase in heft, with the original DualSense weighing in at 278 grams, whereas the Edge has a bit more mass at 336 grams (cheers, kitchen scales). The added weight gives the controller a more premium feel without becoming too noticeable or uncomfortable. Speaking of comfort, the Edge also features a textured grip on both handles and a textured pattern on L2/R2 to ensure your fingers don’t slip off the triggers.

Mechanically, the most obvious additions are the Function buttons, back buttons and trigger locks. A Function button lies beneath the thumbsticks, providing easy access on each hand. These FN buttons can be used to switch between your custom profiles, as well as change the volume and audio mixing if you’re using a headset. Oddly, these buttons can’t be remapped like all the others, but they’re useful in their own right, especially during online gaming sessions with friends that have their mic waaaaay too close to their mouth.

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The back buttons are exactly what you would expect from a premium handset, two triggers that can be mapped to any button on the controller. For instance, while playing Battlefield 2042, I had the left set to crouch and the right set to reload, ensuring that my thumbs could stay firmly planted on the sticks at all times. Both sets feel solid and tactile, but the half-dome back buttons won my heart. These much smaller triggers won’t alter your grip on the controller, but they’re still easily accessible, making for a more comfortable hold. The paddle triggers are also great, so it’ll come down to personal preference in the end.

All of the bits and pieces fit nicely in the very sharp case

Last but not least, there is a trigger lock on both L2 and R2, shortening the pull distance and actioning the input sooner. There are three options, regular, half and short, and can be changed at the flick of the switch. It’s particularly handy when playing shooters, as that few extra milliseconds could make the difference between me dying instantly or dying after putting a few rounds into my adversary.

The interchangeable sticks are another feature that allows you to truly customise your experience. Experimenting with different combinations, I rested on a regular cap on the left and a high dome on the right, giving me some added accuracy during my games of BF. I do find it a bit strange that there’s no high concave option, but I could see those being sold separately in the future.

Opening the front face of the controller by hitting a small release at the back unveils a very nifty little feature that future-proofs the Edge, saving you some cash in the long run. The stick modules can be removed entirely and replaced, allowing you to swap them out for $35 instead of taking out a loan and buying another complete controller for the staggering $340.

The components snap together solidly, but are nice and easy to swap out

The customisation options don’t stop at thumbsticks and back paddles; there’s plenty more to be tinkered with once you connect it to your console. Using a dedicated menu that was recently added to the PS5 via an update, you can wade through a slew of options to fine-tune your experience. Reassigning every button on the controller (minus the pair of FN buttons) is nice and easy, and so is adjusting the deadzone for each thumbstick. You can even adjust the sensitivity of L2 and R2, further tweaking how and when the triggers kick in. All of these changes can be saved to one of the nameable profiles and changed on the fly by using the FN buttons to swap between them. Going through these options with a fine-toothed comb is satisfying, and being able to quickly and easily change from one profile to the next is very user-friendly.

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After using the Edge for a few short days, I found it hard to reach for one of my regular DualSense controllers until I was forced to. Yes, the major drawback to the Edge having all of these bells and whistles is the battery life. I found that I was averaging a bit over four hours of use before needing to use that nice braided cable, which is a decent dip compared to the already lacklustre life of the DualSense. On the positive side, the case does have a small Velcro flap at the back, letting you charge the Edge while it takes a nap in its very flashy house.

The Edge UI is clean and easy to use, making profile configuration a breeze 

Final Thoughts

I’ve tiptoed around the exorbitant elephant in the room, mainly because of how much I love the DualSense Edge. It’s a controller that both looks and feels premium, offering a massive range of customisation options from physical to digital. Tailoring your handset to the exact specifications of the game you’re playing while having two other profiles waiting in the wings is a luxury I don’t want to live without now that I have it. The issue, of course, is that the premium comes at a premium. Running you almost half the cost of a PS5 is an insanely tall ask, but if you have the disposable income, it’s an investment you will not regret.

Review unit supplied by the manufacturer 

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PS5 DualSense Edge Controller Review
An Edge on the competition
A high-end controller with a high asking price, the DualSense Edge is a fantastic, highly-customisable controller with amazing features that eat away at its battery life.
The Good
Looks and feels like a premium product
Back buttons and swappable sticks are excellent
Digital customisation is granular, yet easy to use
The replaceable stick modules combat the great evil that is stick drift
The Bad
I love it, but $340 is insane
Lesser battery life is a bummer
Little love shown to concave caps

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.
PS5 DualSense Edge Controller Review
An Edge on the competition
A high-end controller with a high asking price, the DualSense Edge is a fantastic, highly-customisable controller with amazing features that eat away at its battery life.
The Good
Looks and feels like a premium product
Back buttons and swappable sticks are excellent
Digital customisation is granular, yet easy to use
The replaceable stick modules combat the great evil that is stick drift
The Bad
I love it, but $340 is insane
Lesser battery life is a bummer
Little love shown to concave caps
Written By Adam Ryan

Adam's undying love for all things PlayStation can only be rivalled by his obsession with vacuuming. Whether it's a Dyson or a DualShock in hand you can guarantee he has a passion for it. PSN: TheVacuumVandal XBL: VacuumVandal Steam: TheVacuumVandal

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