Gears 5 Xbox/PC Graphics Comparison & PC Benchmark

Gears 5 Xbox/PC Graphics Comparison & PC Benchmark

One of the biggest strengths that Microsoft has with its first-party studios is how well optimised their titles are. Forza Horizon 4 ran impressively well (as shown in our review) as did Forza Horizon 3 and Gears  4. It seems that the newly released Gears 5 is no different, boasting an impressive set of visuals while maintaining a pretty crisp level of performance. Given how wide the supported hardware for the game is, it comes as no surprise that there can be a remarkable difference in quality (PC players have the luxury of an option to install ultra quality textures). First, let’s take a look at the comparisons between the different platforms:

NOTE: Xbox One X screenshots were captured with HDR active, PC screenshots are with everything set to ultra. All these screenshots are at 4K.

Xbox One X
Xbox One S

 

Xbox One X
Xbox One S

 

Xbox One X
Xbox One S
PC
Xbox One S

 

PC
Xbox One S

 

PC
Xbox One S

 

PC
Xbox One S
PC
Xbox One X

 

PC
Xbox One X

 

PC
Xbox One X

It seems that in a lot of ways, the Xbox One X does a pretty good job at delivering high-quality texutres and assets. While it doesn’t quite stack up to the PC’s ultra settings, it does give it a solid run for its money. The only part where you can definitively say that PC blows the Xbox One X out of the water is with shadows, as shown with the foliage-heavy screenshots. Unfortunately, the Xbox One S doesn’t really compare to the Xbox One X, let alone the PC. Things like anti-aliasing  and LOD bias skew heavily in favour of the X. This isn’t to say that the S doesn’t look great, as Gears 5 still looks very good on the weaker hardware, it’s more just a mark of how scalable the game is. Also take note of how differently the S handles lighting compared to the PC.

Now that the comparisons are out of the way, time to look at the game’s PC performance. Like its predecessor, Gears 5 features a benchmark which is fairly representative of the kinds of rendering loads that the game will throw at a PC (this also makes my job easier). With all the settings cranked to the max, I ran the benchmark at a variety of resolutions, and over the course of a few hours documented the results. For a game that pushes out quality as high as Gears 5, it runs remarkably well.

While it isn’t quite able to pull off 4K 60fps like Gears 4 did, it also has notably higher-quality assets in use, so the average FPS of 48.38 is actually quite understandable. Better yet,  the 99th-Percentile still sits above 30fps, a pretty solid feat considering most games will sit around an average of 30fps, let alone have a 99th-Percentile that high. Naturally, as the pixel count goes down, the performance goes up and an average of 94.32 frames per second at 1080p is a really good result. While it seems the 99th-Percentile doesn’t scale quite as well as the average FPS, they still sit above 60fps which is an admirable result (for reference, Forza Horizon 4 had a much higher 99th-Percentile, but it also doesn’t quite push the visual quality as high as Gears 5).

Overall, it appears that The Coalition has gone the extra mile in ensuring that Gears 5 is as well optimised as possible. Like with most games, the performance stats shown here mean good things for the game’s console counterparts.

  • Motherboard: ASUS ROG Strix X470-F Gaming
  • CPU: Ryzen 2700X 4.2GHz
  • GPU: Gigabyte AORUS GTX 1080 Ti
  • Memory: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 16GB 3000MHz (2x8GB)
  • Cooling: NZXT Kraken x72
Jordan lives and breathes Dark Souls, even though his favourite game is Bloodborne. He takes pride in bashing his face on walls and praising the sun. Hailing from the land of tacos, he is the token minority for WellPlayed.